Server Web For Mac Os X

admin 12/14/2021

A server operating system version of the Mac OS X operating system for Apple computers. Mac OS X Server, also known simply as OS X Server, is available as a $19.99 add-on for the OS X Mountain Lion (v10.8) and Mavericks (v10.9) operating systems. The OS X Server add-on can be purchased through the Mac App Store. Jul 14, 2013 In the recent version of Mac OS X, the web server is one of the component that is built-in by default. Prior to Mountain Lion, users can easily turn on the web server via the “Web Sharing” option in the Sharing Preference pane. That component was removed in Mountain Lion.

  1. Web Server For Mac Os X
  2. Web Server Mac Os X Mojave
  3. Os X Web Server
  4. Install Web Server Mac Os X
  1. A server operating system version of the Mac OS X operating system for Apple computers. Mac OS X Server, also known simply as OS X Server, is available as a $19.99 add-on for the OS X Mountain Lion (v10.8) and Mavericks (v10.9) operating systems. The OS X Server add-on can be purchased through the Mac.
  2. May 02, 2017 Apple created the XQuartz project as a community effort to further develop and support X11 on Mac. The XQuartz project was originally based on the version of X11 included in Mac OS X v10.5. There have since been multiple releases of XQuartz with fixes, support for new features, and additional refinements to the X11 experience.

Mac OS X Server version 10.4 includes QuickTime Streaming Server (QTSS) version 5.5 in its suite of services. QTSS comes preinstalled on Apple server hardware. QTSS is similar in design and configuration to Apache, the popular web server software that is also included in Mac OS X Server. If you have experience working with Apache.

macOS Update: While these instructions still work, there are new posts for recent versions of macOS, the latest being Install Apache, PHP, and MySQL on macOS Mojave.

I have installed Apache, PHP, and MySQL on Mac OS X since Leopard. Each time doing so by hand. Each version of Mac OS X having some minor difference. This post serves as much for my own record as to outline how to install Apache, MySQL, and PHP for a local development environment on Mac OS X Mountain Lion Mavericks.

I am aware of the several packages available, notably MAMP. These packages help get you started quickly. But they forego the learning experience and, as most developers report, eventually break. Personally, the choice to do it myself has proven invaluable.

It is important to remember Mac OS X runs atop UNIX. So all of these technologies install easily on Mac OS X. Furthermore, Apache and PHP are included by default. In the end, you only install MySQL then simply turn everything on.

First, open Terminal and switch to root to avoid permission issues while running these commands.

Enable Apache on Mac OS X

Server Web For Mac Os X

Note: Prior to Mountain Lion this was an option for Web Sharing in System Prefrences → Sharing.

Verify It works! by accessing http://localhost

Enable PHP for Apache

OS X Mavericks Update: You will need to rerun the steps in this section after upgrading an existing install to Mac OS X Mavericks.

First, make a backup of the default Apache configuration. This is good practice and serves as a comparison against future versions of Mac OS X.

Now edit the Apache configuration. Feel free to use TextEdit if you are not familiar with vi.

Uncomment the following line (remove #):

Restart Apache:

Install MySQL

  1. Download the MySQL DMG for Mac OS X
  2. Install MySQL
  3. Install Preference Pane
  4. Open System Preferences → MySQL
  5. Ensure the MySQL Server is running
  6. Optionally, you can enable MySQL to start automatically. I do.

The README also suggests creating aliases for mysql and mysqladmin. However there are other commands that are helpful such as mysqldump. Instead, I updated my path to include /usr/local/mysql/bin.

Note: You will need to open a new Terminal window or run the command above for your path to update.

I also run mysql_secure_installation. While this isn't necessary, it's good practice.

Connect PHP and MySQL

You need to ensure PHP and MySQL can communicate with one another. There are several options to do so. I do the following:

Creating VirtualHosts

You could stop here. PHP, MySQL, and Apache are all running. However, all of your sites would have URLs like http://localhost/somesite/ pointing to /Library/WebServer/Documents/somesite. Not ideal for a local development environment.

OS X Mavericks Update: You will need to rerun the steps below to uncomment the vhostInclude after upgrading an existing install to Mac OS X Mavericks.

Web Server For Mac Os X

To run sites individually you need to enable VirtualHosts. To do so, we'll edit the Apache Configuration again.

Uncomment the following line:

Now Apache will load httpd-vhosts.conf. Let's edit this file.

Here is an example of VirtualHosts I've created.

The first VirtualHost points to /Library/WebServer/Documents. The first VirtualHost is important as it behaves like the default Apache configuration and used when no others match.

The second VirtualHost points to my dev workspace and I can access it directly from http://jason.local. For ease of development, I also configured some custom logs.

Note: I use the extension local. This avoids conflicts with any real extensions and serves as a reminder I'm in my local environment.

Restart Apache:

In order to access http://jason.local, you need to edit your hosts file.

Add the following line to the bottom:

I run the following to clear the local DNS cache:

Now you can access http://jason.local.

Note: You will need to create a new VirtualHost and edit your hosts file each time you make a new local site.

A note about permissions

You may receive 403 Forbidden when you visit your local site. This is likely a permissions issue. Simply put, the Apache user (_www) needs to have access to read, and sometimes write, your web directory.

If you are not familiar with permissions, read more. For now though, the easiest thing to do is ensure your web directory has permissions of 755. You can change permissions with the command:

In my case, all my files were under my local ~/Documents directory. Which by default is only readable by me. So I had to change permissions for my web directory all the way up to ~/Documents to resolve the 403 Forbidden issue.

Note: There are many ways to solve permission issues. I have provided this as the easiest solution, not the best.

Install PHPMyAdmin

Unless you want to administer MySQL from the command line, I recommend installing PHPMyAdmin. I won't go into the details. Read the installation guide for more information. I install utility applications in the default directory. That way I can access them under, in this case, http://localhost/phpmyadmin.

Closing

A local development environment is a mandatory part of the Software Development Process. Given the ease at which you can install Apache, PHP, and MySQL on Mac OS X there really is no excuse.

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16 13 likes 31,756 views Last modified Jan 31, 2019 11:25 AM

Here is my definitive guide to getting a local web server running on OS X 10.14 “Mojave”. This is meant to be a development platform so that you can build and test your sites locally, then deploy to an internet server. This User Tip only contains instructions for configuring the Apache server, PHP module, and Perl module. I have another User Tip for installing and configuring MySQL and email servers.


Note: This user tip is specific to macOS 10.14 “Mojave”. Pay attention to your OS version. There have been significant changes since earlier versions of macOS.Another note: These instructions apply to the client versions of OS X, not Server. Server does a few specific tricks really well and is a good choice for those. For things like database, web, and mail services, I have found it easier to just setup the client OS version manually.


Requirements:

  1. Basic understanding of Terminal.app and how to run command-line programs.
  2. Basic understanding of web servers.
  3. Basic usage of vi. You can substitute nano if you want.


Optional: Xcode is required for adding PHP modules.


Lines in bold are what you will have to type in. Lines in bold courier should be typed at the Terminal.Replace <your short user name> with your short user name.


Here goes... Enjoy!


To get started, edit the Apache configuration file as root:

sudo vi /etc/apache2/httpd.conf


Enable PHP by uncommenting line 177, changing:

#LoadModule php7_module libexec/apache2/libphp7.so

to

LoadModule php7_module libexec/apache2/libphp7.so

(If you aren't familiar with vi, go to line 177 by typing '177G' (without the quotes). Then just press 'x' over the '#' character to delete it. Then type ':w!' to save, or just 'ZZ' to save and quit. Don't do that yet though. More changes are still needed.)

Server Web For Mac Os X


If you want to run Perl scripts, you will have to do something similar:


Enable Perl by uncommenting line 178, changing:

#LoadModule perl_module libexec/apache2/mod_perl.so

to

LoadModule perl_module libexec/apache2/mod_perl.so


Enable personal websites by uncommenting the following at line 174:

#LoadModule userdir_module libexec/apache2/mod_userdir.so

to

LoadModule userdir_module libexec/apache2/mod_userdir.so


and do the same at line 511:

#Include /private/etc/apache2/extra/httpd-userdir.conf

to

Include /private/etc/apache2/extra/httpd-userdir.conf

Now save and quit.


Open the file you just enabled above with:

sudo vi /etc/apache2/extra/httpd-userdir.conf

and uncomment the following at line 16:

#Include /private/etc/apache2/users/*.conf

to

Include /private/etc/apache2/users/*.conf

Save and exit.


Lion and later versions no longer create personal web sites by default. If you already had a Sites folder in Snow Leopard, it should still be there. To create one manually, enter the following:

mkdir ~/Sites

echo '<html><body><h1>My site works</h1></body></html>' > ~/Sites/index.html.en


While you are in /etc/apache2, double-check to make sure you have a user config file. It should exist at the path: /etc/apache2/users/<your short user name>.conf.


That file may not exist and if you upgrade from an older version, you may still not have it. It does appear to be created when you create a new user. If that file doesn't exist, you will need to create it with:

sudo vi /etc/apache2/users/<your short user name>.conf


Use the following as the content:

<Directory '/Users/<your short user name>/Sites/'>

AddLanguage en .en

AddHandler perl-script .pl

PerlHandler ModPerl::Registry

Options Indexes MultiViews FollowSymLinks ExecCGI

AllowOverride None

Require host localhost

</Directory>


Now you are ready to turn on Apache itself. But first, do a sanity check. Sometimes copying and pasting from an internet forum can insert invisible, invalid characters into config files. Check your configuration by running the following command in the Terminal:

apachectl configtest


If this command returns 'Syntax OK' then you are ready to go. It may also print a warning saying 'httpd: Could not reliably determine the server's fully qualified domain name'. You could fix this by setting the ServerName directive in /etc/apache2/httpd.conf and adding a matching entry into /etc/hosts. But for a development server, you don't need to do anything. You can just ignore that warning. You can safely ignore other warnings too.

Server


Turn on the Apache httpd service by running the following command in the Terminal:

sudo launchctl load -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/org.apache.httpd.plist


In Safari, navigate to your web site with the following address:

http://localhost/


It should say:


It works!


Now try your user home directory:

http://localhost/~<your short user name>


It should say:


My site works


Now try PHP. Create a PHP info file with:

echo '<?php echo phpinfo(); ?>' > ~/Sites/info.php


Web Server Mac Os X Mojave

And test it by entering the following into Safari's address bar:

http://localhost/~<your short user name>/info.php


You should see your PHP configuration information.


To test Perl, try something similar. Create a Perl test file with:

echo 'print $ENV{MOD_PERL} . qq{n};' > ~/Sites/info.pl


And test it by entering the following into Safari's address bar:

http://localhost/~<your short user name>/info.pl


You should see the string 'mod_perl/2.0.9'.


If you want to setup MySQL, see my User Tip on Installing MySQL.


If you want to add modules to PHP, I suggest the following site. I can't explain it any better.

Os X Web Server


If you want to make further changes to your Apache system or user config files, you will need to restart the Apache server with:

Install Web Server Mac Os X

sudo apachectl graceful